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SCIENCE thread!

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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by ErebusV8 on Mon 8 Jul 2013 - 22:05

Standaman94 wrote:Phun phact:

Ping-pong balls are made of a stuff called celluloid, which is similar to gun cotton (aka flash paper, aka nitrocellulose). This is very flammable and is prone to ignition.

In fact, in the old days ping pong balls were made of acidified celluloid, which was even more unstable and could randomly ignite during a game; Over time, the composition would become increasingly unstable, and a slight spark (or even heat from friction) would ignite an old ball.
They also burn hot as heck.

If you cut a hole in a ppball, stuff it with another shredded one, wrap it in foil, leaving a hole, and ignite the inside, it'll create an awesome smoke grenade. (When I say awesome, I mean lots of fire and a bit of smoke)

been there done that will do it again for sure!!! Laughing Laughing Laughing 


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by KaneGR4 on Thu 11 Jul 2013 - 0:38


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Sun 21 Jul 2013 - 21:22

WAVES with MARS BARS and SCIENCE







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Mon 22 Jul 2013 - 20:01







If you want to survive out here, you've got to know where your towel is.

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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Thu 8 Aug 2013 - 15:18

Computers sort numbers with algorithms, which compare two items at a time. There are numerous algorithms that do the same thing, but some are quicker than others.

This video demonstrates 15 of them. Each time a number is compared, a sound is made; A big number makes a high noise and a low number makes a low one.







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Sat 24 Aug 2013 - 23:08







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Thu 5 Sep 2013 - 10:27

Weird webs in the Amazon with no known origin..

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2013/09/weird-weblike-thing/?mbid=social11521844






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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Fri 13 Sep 2013 - 14:11

Spot the frog!







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Fri 13 Sep 2013 - 15:19

Scientists discover the first natural gear

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/environment/the-first-gear-discovered-in-nature-15916433?click=pm_latest









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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by XPR Roadrunner on Fri 13 Sep 2013 - 16:22

Voyager Spacecraft entered Interstellar space!

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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 11:32

ALIENS

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/the-truth-is-out-there-british-scientists-claim-to-have-found-proof-of-alien-life-8826690.html






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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Wed 16 Oct 2013 - 10:53

Aaaannnnd.... WHAAM







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by ErebusV8 on Wed 16 Oct 2013 - 11:39

been doing space physics in, well, physics this term, talking about relativity, space time, string theory, oh my god, best subject ever, it even beats (dare i say it) car physics that we did last year,
yesterday we were talking about Einstein's theory's, well one of many,
mainly simultantious events. which is basically about that a single event in time can be seen by two different at two different times and ways,
the example we were given was a train travelling at the speed of light, if there were two doors, front and back that were triggered by a light placed precisely in the middle of the room, the guy in the train who presses the button to turn on the light will see the two doors open at the same time, but a bystander on a platform who sees the train come past will (when the person on the train hits the button) the back door will open before the front because the light (form it's original source) has a shorter distance to travel to the back door than the front door (at their current locations) so the bystander will see the back open before the front

we were also talking about how if you are in a car you seem to be still and the environment around you is moving, but if you are watching a car drive past, it seems to be the one moving and the environment around it stays still, and how difference reference points and 'rest frames' will give a viewer a different experience and view of the same event

it is the best physics ever established and (somewhat) understood and i could talk about it for hours on end


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Mon 21 Oct 2013 - 19:18

Donut lasers are the future! http://www.bu.edu/bostonia/fall13/internet/






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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by v Hurricane v on Mon 21 Oct 2013 - 19:51


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Fri 8 Nov 2013 - 12:36

I hope you like freaky 250 year old robots







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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by BG Beanz on Wed 13 Nov 2013 - 17:28


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by BG Beanz on Thu 14 Nov 2013 - 23:06


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by KaneGR4 on Thu 14 Nov 2013 - 23:56

That really is evolution done right.

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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Sat 14 Dec 2013 - 12:08

Here's something you'll want to see.

http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/1000hPa/

It's a real-time visualisation of wind currents on Earth, from the surface all the way up to the stratosphere. Right now, Ireland is the windiest place on Earth.

Click the "Earth" button on the bottom right to bring up some options. On Height, 1000 hPa is the surface, and 10 hPa is the stratosphere.






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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by Standaman94 on Sun 2 Feb 2014 - 16:03



There were a lot of things we couldn't do in an SR-71, but we were the fastest guys on the block and loved reminding our fellow aviators of this fact. People often asked us if, because of this fact, it was fun to fly the jet. Fun would not be the first word I would use to describe flying this plane. Intense, maybe. Even cerebral. But there was one day in our Sled experience when we would have to say that it was pure fun to be the fastest guys out there, at least for a moment.

It occurred when Walt and I were flying our final training sortie. We needed 100 hours in the jet to complete our training and attain Mission Ready status. Somewhere over Colorado we had passed the century mark. We had made the turn in Arizona and the jet was performing flawlessly. My gauges were wired in the front seat and we were starting to feel pretty good about ourselves, not only because we would soon be flying real missions but because we had gained a great deal of confidence in the plane in the past ten months. Ripping across the barren deserts 80,000 feet below us, I could already see the coast of California from the Arizona border. I was, finally, after many humbling months of simulators and study, ahead of the jet.

I was beginning to feel a bit sorry for Walter in the back seat. There he was, with no really good view of the incredible sights before us, tasked with monitoring four different radios. This was good practice for him for when we began flying real missions, when a priority transmission from headquarters could be vital. It had been difficult, too, for me to relinquish control of the radios, as during my entire flying career I had controlled my own transmissions. But it was part of the division of duties in this plane and I had adjusted to it. I still insisted on talking on the radio while we were on the ground, however. Walt was so good at many things, but he couldn't match my expertise at sounding smooth on the radios, a skill that had been honed sharply with years in fighter squadrons where the slightest radio miscue was grounds for beheading. He understood that and allowed me that luxury.

Just to get a sense of what Walt had to contend with, I pulled the radio toggle switches and monitored the frequencies along with him. The predominant radio chatter was from Los Angeles Center, far below us, controlling daily traffic in their sector. While they had us on their scope (albeit briefly), we were in uncontrolled airspace and normally would not talk to them unless we needed to descend into their airspace.
We listened as the shaky voice of a lone Cessna pilot asked Center for a readout of his ground speed. Center replied: "November Charlie 175, I'm showing you at ninety knots on the ground."

Now the thing to understand about Center controllers, was that whether they were talking to a rookie pilot in a Cessna, or to Air Force One, they always spoke in the exact same, calm, deep, professional, tone that made one feel important. I referred to it as the " Houston Center voice." I have always felt that after years of seeing documentaries on this country's space program and listening to the calm and distinct voice of the Houston controllers, that all other controllers since then wanted to sound like that, and that they basically did. And it didn't matter what sector of the country we would be flying in, it always seemed like the same guy was talking. Over the years that tone of voice had become somewhat of a comforting sound to pilots everywhere. Conversely, over the years, pilots always wanted to ensure that, when transmitting, they sounded like Chuck Yeager, or at least like John Wayne. Better to die than sound bad on the radios.

Just moments after the Cessna's inquiry, a Twin Beech piped up on frequency, in a rather superior tone, asking for his ground speed. "I have you at one hundred and twenty-five knots of ground speed." Boy, I thought, the Beechcraft really must think he is dazzling his Cessna brethren. Then out of the blue, a navy F-18 pilot out of NAS Lemoore came up on frequency. You knew right away it was a Navy jock because he sounded very cool on the radios. "Center, Dusty 52 ground speed check". Before Center could reply, I'm thinking to myself, hey, Dusty 52 has a ground speed indicator in that million-dollar cockpit, so why is he asking Center for a readout? Then I got it, ol' Dusty here is making sure that every bug smasher from Mount Whitney to the Mojave knows what true speed is. He's the fastest dude in the valley today, and he just wants everyone to know how much fun he is having in his new Hornet. And the reply, always with that same, calm, voice, with more distinct alliteration than emotion: "Dusty 52, Center, we have you at 620 on the ground."

And I thought to myself, is this a ripe situation, or what? As my hand instinctively reached for the mic button, I had to remind myself that Walt was in control of the radios. Still, I thought, it must be done - in mere seconds we'll be out of the sector and the opportunity will be lost. That Hornet must die, and die now. I thought about all of our Sim training and how important it was that we developed well as a crew and knew that to jump in on the radios now would destroy the integrity of all that we had worked toward becoming. I was torn.

Somewhere, 13 miles above Arizona, there was a pilot screaming inside his space helmet. Then, I heard it. The click of the mic button from the back seat. That was the very moment that I knew Walter and I had become a crew. Very professionally, and with no emotion, Walter spoke: "Los Angeles Center, Aspen 20, can you give us a ground speed check?" There was no hesitation, and the replay came as if was an everyday request. "Aspen 20, I show you at one thousand eight hundred and forty-two knots, across the ground."

I think it was the forty-two knots that I liked the best, so accurate and proud was Center to deliver that information without hesitation, and you just knew he was smiling. But the precise point at which I knew that Walt and I were going to be really good friends for a long time was when he keyed the mic once again to say, in his most fighter-pilot-like voice: "Ah, Center, much thanks, we're showing closer to nineteen hundred on the money."

For a moment Walter was a god. And we finally heard a little crack in the armor of the Houston Center voice, when L.A.came back with, "Roger that Aspen, Your equipment is probably more accurate than ours. You boys have a good one."

It all had lasted for just moments, but in that short, memorable sprint across the southwest, the Navy had been flamed, all mortal airplanes on freq were forced to bow before the King of Speed, and more importantly, Walter and I had crossed the threshold of being a crew. A fine day's work. We never heard another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast.

For just one day, it truly was fun being the fastest guys out there.

So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked, “what was the slowest you ever flew the Blackbird?” This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following.

I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England, with my back-seater, Walt Watson; we were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base. As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past. The air cadet commander there was a former Blackbird pilot, and thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach. No problem, we were happy to do it. After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea, we proceeded to find the small airfield.

Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment in the back seat, and began to vector me toward the field. Descending to subsonic speeds, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in a slight haze. Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close and that I should be able to see the field, but I saw nothing. Nothing but trees as far as I could see in the haze. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from 325 knots we were at. With the gear up, anything under 275 was just uncomfortable. Walt said we were practically over the field—yet; there was nothing in my windscreen. I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver in hopes of picking up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the cadet commander had taken the cadets up on the catwalk of the tower in order to get a prime view of the fly-past. It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast. Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us but in the overcast and haze, I couldn’t see it. The longer we continued to peer out the window and circle, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets heard nothing. I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges. As I noticed the airspeed indicator slide below 160 knots, my heart stopped and my adrenalin-filled left hand pushed two throttles full forward. At this point we weren’t really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment that both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame (and what a joyous feeling that was) the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the tower. Shattering the still quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their face as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the tower side of the infield, closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge pass.

Quickly reaching the field boundary, we proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident. We didn’t say a word for those next 14 minutes. After landing, our commander greeted us, and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings. Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen, especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as breathtaking. He said that some of the cadet’s hats were blown off and the sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner dropping right in front of them was unbelievable. Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning, and sheepishly replied that they were just excited to see our low approach.

As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there-we hadn’t spoken a word since “the pass.” Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “One hundred fifty-six knots. What did you see?” Trying to find my voice, I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.” We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt said, “Don’t ever do that to me again!” And I never did.

A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer’s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he had seen one day. Of course, by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows. Noticing our HABU patches, as we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, he asked us to verify to the cadets that such a thing had occurred. Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach; they’re pretty impressive in that plane.” Impressive indeed.

From the book "Sled Driver"






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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by skyshadow5 on Sun 2 Feb 2014 - 17:10

Brilliant lol, must get this book.

~sky~

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Re: SCIENCE thread!

Post by ErebusV8 on Mon 14 Jul 2014 - 13:31

HOW DARE this be on page 3!!
anyway, introducing Vantablack
http://sciencealert.com.au/news/20141407-25870.html

uses carbon nanotubes 10,000 times thinner than a human hair compressed together so tightly it blocks 99.96% of light, visible and non visible, which is a new world record. It is so black that your eyes and brain cannot physically discern the shape or dimensions of it,

It's as close to a black whole as we can create and I love it!


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Re: SCIENCE thread!

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